Great Bear Rainforest - Protecting Our Land and Sea

Nathan E. Stewart Diesel Spill

Voices of the Great Bear - Gary Housty Sr

Gary says his parents backyard is turned into a cannery when they can and barbeque salmon each summer. An oil spill would devastate his community.

Voices of the Great Bear - Frank Brown

Healthy ecosystems are essential if coastal First Nations are to develop economic opportunities like scallop farms and ocean ranching. The Great Bear is no place for oil tankers.

Voices of the Great Bear - Doug Neasloss

Doug Neasloss talks about importance of tourism his community. Everything is connected. The Great Bear is no place for oil tankers.

Voices of the Great Bear - Bruce Lansdowne

Bruce Lansdowne says all Canadians should care about the Great Bear because we are all interconnected. The Great Bear is no place for oil tankers.

Voices of the Great Bear - Students' favorite seafoods and animals

Bella Bella Community School students share their favorite seafoods and favorite animals in the Great Bear.

Voices of the Great Bear - Bella Bella Community Students

Heiltsuk language class students sing a song that thanks the Creator for our land and sea and gives their high or great feelings to the Creator.

Voices of the Great Bear - Blake Robert Lansdowne

Blake a student at Bella Bella Community School talks about why he loves living in the Great Bear and how the environment would be impacted by an oil spill.

Voices of the Great Bear - Ian Reid

Ian Reid, Heiltsuk Artist The Great Bear is important not just to the Heiltsuk people, but the global community.

Voices of the Great Bear - Beth Humchitt

Heiltsuk Nation member Beth Humchitt sings "Protect Mother Earth" from the inevitable risk of an oil spill.

Who's on the hook?

Coastal First Nations Executive Director, Art Sterritt, talks with Global TV about our new undercover investigation showing Canadian taxpayers are "on the hook" for clean up costs in the event of a major oil spill.

Undercover Investigation: Who really pays for an oil spill? (Part 2/2)

Oil tankers are operated by "anonymous" companies to limit their owners' liability, making it almost impossible to recover costs over and above the minimal coverage provided by international pollution funds.

Undercover Investigation: Who really pays for an oil spill? (Part 1/2)

Going undercover, we asked six of the world's largest oil tanker companies what would happen if one of their ships spilled in Canadian waters and who would have to clean it up. Their response will surprise you.

Coastal First Nations Re-Write Enbridge's Latest Pipeline Ad Campaign

Inspired by a leaked ad script for the Northern Gateway pipeline (Vancouver Sun article: http://ow.ly/po1CM), this short story is about a five-year old girl named Koda who has a special relationship with whales. Orca photo: http://www.forwhales.org

The Sound of Silence - Exxon Valdez Oil Spill

80% of British Columbians oppose oil tanker traffic in our coastal waters. Produced by the Coastal First Nations (https://www.coastalfirstnations.ca), this video opens with Exxon Valdez Captain Joe Hazelwood's radio call to Coast Guard, accompanied by The Sound of Silence, by Simon and Garfunkel. It concludes with a simple message: "British Columbians have spoken. Will Stephen Harper listen?" Paul Simon's music label granted the rights to use the song for a small honorarium after the Coastal First Nations wrote to him personally, telling him about the Great Bear Rainforest and the danger that oil tankers pose to BC's coastal communities.

Have you heard the radio call from the Exxon Valdez?

24 years later and this still gives us a sinking feeling. This is the actual radio call from the Exxon Valdez to Coast Guard, reporting the oil spill. Released on the 24th anniversary of the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill, this two-minute video reminds us of the dangers and costs that oil tankers and pipelines pose to our coastal waters. Produced by the Coastal First Nations (https://www.coastalfirstnations.ca), the video opens with Exxon Valdez Captain Joe Hazelwood's radio call to Coast Guard, accompanied by The Sound of Silence, by Simon and Garfunkel. It concludes with a simple message: "Don't be silent. Vote for an oil-free coast." Paul Simon's music label granted the rights to use the song for a small honorarium after the Coastal First Nations wrote to him personally, telling him about the Great Bear Rainforest and the danger that oil tankers pose to the coastal communities that live here. Please share far and wide!